Driving school

Temuka’s new sergeant wants to change the ‘average attitude’ towards drunk driving

New Sergeant Malcolm Lindsay, from Temuka, said he applied for the job because it was something he had never done before.

Yashas Srinivasa / Stuff

New Sergeant Malcolm Lindsay, from Temuka, said he applied for the job because it was something he had never done before.

Temuka’s new top cop promises to get tough on bad drivers in his patch with a particular focus on drunk driving.

Sergeant Malcolm Lindsay says he wants to change people’s “average attitude” towards drunk driving in the city.

The 29-year-old, who comes from a background of targeting high-risk driving offenders, said drunk driving is a problem he has seen in the Temuka area since he was began his role several months ago.

“There is a pretty average attitude towards him. We will soon be launching drunk driving operations in Temuka, Geraldine and Pleasant Point,” he said.

READ MORE:
* South Canterbury sergeant retires after 34 years of service
* South Canterbury Community Councils are funding mobile cameras for police use in rural areas
* Pleasant Point has the highest burglary solve rate in New Zealand

He will focus heavily on traffic policing in Temuka, he said.

“If you break the rules of the road, expect to get a ticket and there will be no leniency.”

Other issues he has noticed in the city are online fraud and rural burglaries such as fuel theft, sprinklers, fences, agricultural systems. He wants to address them all.

“We’ll be working more with people around prevention, like making sure people store things safely and write down serial numbers.”

Lindsay also noticed that online fraud and rural burglaries are a problem in the city.

Yashas Srinivasa / Stuff

Lindsay also noticed that online fraud and rural burglaries are a problem in the city.

Lindsay applied for the sergeant position in Temuka because it was something he had never done before.

“I started the police in Timaru, my family stays in Twizel.

“My job is to support the constables and staff at Temuka, Geraldine and Pleasant Point, so they can meet the expectations of the community and the police.”

He will be responsible for eight police personnel, including four based in Temuka, two in Geraldine, one in Pleasant Point (starting in July) and a post support officer based in Temuka.

Sergeant Malcolm Lindsay, left, with Constable Geraldine Karl Harrison at Temuka Police Station.

Yashas Srinivasa / Stuff

Sergeant Malcolm Lindsay, left, with Constable Geraldine Karl Harrison at Temuka Police Station.

He said everyone in town had been welcoming, which was “refreshing” and said there was good support in town from Arohenua Whanau Services and the Arohenua Marae.

“The marae are really engaged in the community, which is impressive.

“I would like to have a closer relationship with the marae and the community. I will support them anyway, and they have been a great support to me before.

Lindsay, born in Dunedin, grew up in Twizel and went to school in the Twizel area.

He joined the police because it was a career he could progress in and the police was not an average job.

“There are a lot of different areas you can work in. It’s not like your average job where you’ll be stuck in the office every day.

“I joined because of the variety and the potential.”

Timaru was his first assignment out of police academy. He has also spent time in Wellington, Lower Hutt and Papua New Guinea helping with Asia-Pacific economic cooperation.

Malcolm Lindsay's first posting out of police college was at Timaru as a constable.  He is seen with stolen items recovered from a Timaru address in 2015.

Mytchall Bransgrove / Stuff

Malcolm Lindsay’s first posting out of police college was at Timaru as a constable. He is seen with stolen items recovered from a Timaru address in 2015.

Something Lindsay would like to see in the future is a better police driver training scheme, similar to the one in the UK.

“This will allow police personnel to be better equipped to handle incidents, including getaway driving incidents,” Lindsay said.

“Legislation needs to be updated on high-risk driving and police also need to take action to hold offenders to account and warn victims of crime.”