Driving lesson

Girl, 17, fined for taking driving lesson during lockdown gets ANOTHER penalty

Girl, 17, fined $1,650 for taking a driving lesson with her mum during lockdown, gets ANOTHER penalty even though cops admit they were wrong

  • Hunter Reynolds, 17, was slapped with a $1,652 fine for an unnecessary trip in April
  • The teenager was taking a driving lesson with her mum during the COVID-19 lockdown
  • Police admitted they were wrong, but Hunter got a good callback anyway
  • Here’s how to help people affected by Covid-19










A teenage girl who was fined for taking a driving lesson with her mum during the coronavirus lockdown has been given another sentence, despite police admitting she was wrong.

Hunter Reynolds, 17, was fined $1,652 on the spot for an unnecessary trip while driving with his mother in April. The duo had traveled around 30km from their home in Hampton to Frankston in Victoria.

Police later withdrew the fine after her story sparked public outrage.

However, last week Hunter received a surprise in the mail. She received a reminder that she still owed $1,652 and late fees for not paying the fine.

Hunter Reynolds was fined $1,652 for taking a driving lesson with her mother during coronavirus restrictions

The teenager plans to challenge the fine, which was marked

The teenager plans to challenge the fine, which was marked ‘non-essential travel’ on the ticket (pictured)

“It’s just disappointing for a young girl, when she opened this letter, we felt awful when she was told it was all done and dusted off,” Hunter’s father, Shane Reynolds, told the Herald Sun.

‘I just want it fixed for her.

“She obeyed the rules 100% during the pandemic, she didn’t see a single friend during the lockdown, she only left the house to go to work.”

Victoria Police said the letter was sent in error as the fine had been withdrawn.

“Victoria Police can confirm they have withdrawn the fine imposed on a learner driver. There was an administrative error that resulted in a reminder letter being incorrectly sent to the driver,” the statement read.

“This should not have happened and the issue is now resolved.”

The force would contact Hunter to apologize for the error after Deputy Commissioner Shane Patton said in April that she had been removed.

Hunter Reynolds (pictured), 17, was learning to drive with his mother in Frankston, Victoria on Sunday when a police officer pulled them over

Hunter Reynolds (pictured), 17, was learning to drive with his mother in Frankston, Victoria on Sunday when a police officer pulled them over

The Department of Justice told AAP that waiving fines and issuing recall notices is the responsibility of the agency that first issued it — in this case, the city police. Victoria.

Chief Police Commissioner Graham Ashton told a committee last week that 337 of 5,604 coronavirus-related fines had been withdrawn or waived.

It has not yet been revealed whether any other fines waived or canceled have slipped through the cracks, with data yet to be gathered, police said.

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